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Our petitions asking the Government to create the money for the nation

on Wednesday, 01 January 2003. Posted in Monetary Reform

Our petitions asking the Government to create the money for the nation have been accepted and presented in the House of Commons

14,533 signatures were presented on February 18, 2003

And 2,604 other signatures asking to cancel the national debt Were presented on May 21, 2002 in the House of Commons  For a total of 73,433 signatures

We thank Mr. Guy St-Julien. Liberal MP for Abitibi

We congratulate and thank Mr. St-Julien for carrying so well his mandate of representative of the people. When all the Members of Parliament will imitate him, laws will be at the service of the common good. After three sessions, a total of 73,433 signatures have been presented in the House of Commons to cancel the national debt. On February 18, 2003, Mr. St-Julien presented 14,533 signatures asking the Government to create the money for the nation. Here is what he said in French in the House on that occasion (this is our translation):

"Mr. Speaker, I have the honour today to present several thousand signatures from all over the province of Quebec, including its remote regions. The undersigned residents of Canada wish to draw to the attention of the House of Commons that any efforts by the Government to put the economy back on its feet and guarantee the economic security of Canadians will be in vain unless the Federal Government takes back its power to create money, without debt nor interest payments, for the smooth running of the economy and the well-being of all the Canadians.

"The petitioners therefore call upon Parliament to ask the Government to create the money for the nation, and they base their request on the abundant production of this country, for which its people are responsible."

Bad translation in the "Hansard"

All that is said in the House of Commons is published in the "Hansard," the official journal of Parliament. Here is how this speech of Mr. St-Julien was reproduced in English; we have put in bold italic the lines that are wrongly translated:

37th PARLIAMENT, 2nd SESSION

EDITED HANSARD NUMBER 62

Tuesday, February 18, 2003

Presenting Petitions

Pursuant to Standing Order 36, petitions certified correct by the Clerk of Petitions were presented as follows: by Mr. St-Julien (Abitibi–Baie-James-Nunavik), two concerning the national debt (Nos, 372-1115 and 3721116).

The ECONOMY

Mr. Guy St-Julien (Abitibi-Baie-James-Nunavik, Lib.); "Mr. Speaker, I have the honour today to present several thousand signatures from all over the province of Quebec, including its remote regions..

"The undersigned residents of Canada wish to draw to the attention of the House of Commons that any efforts by the Government to put the economy back on its feet and guarantee the economic security of Canadians will be in vain unless the Federal Government can eliminate the debt, stop making interest payments, and begin running this country properly in the interests of all Canadians.

"The petitioners therefore call upon Parliament to ask the Government to create wealth for the country, basing their request on the abundant production of this country, for which its people are responsible."

As you can see, the translation is far from being correct, to say the least, since it means something totally different. In his speech, Mr. St-Julien read correctly the text of our petition, which was deposited in the two official languages of Canada; so the translator had only to use our petition in English, which he manifestly did not do.

Following the publication of this Hansard, here is a letter that one of our apostles of New Brunswick, Mr. Leopold Soucy, wrote to Mr. St-Julien:

This is to thank and congratulate you for having presented to the House a petition asking the Federal Government to take back its power to issue money for the good of the nation instead of letting the private banks create it, and then borrowing it at interest from them.

However, the English version leaves much to be desired. I don't know who is responsible for it, but it is weird and really silly. Instead of asking the Government to create money, it asks the Government to create wealth. As we know, the Government cannot create wealth, although it is good at spending it, often wastefully. English-speaking people must have a poor opinion of the petitioners who make such a ridiculous request.

Wealth, the goods and services that answer our needs, is created by the work of the producers. Money is created in two different ways: first, by stamping or printing coins and bills, and secondly, by granting credits in bank accounts. In Canada, more than ninety-five percent of the money is created by the banks as bank-account credit.

When the Government spends money by issuing cheques on its bank credit, it is the population that provides the goods and services bought by these cheques. It is a form of taxation, as the population cannot enjoy that part of its production used by the Government, but must be content with the remainder. The banks provide absolutely nothing, and if the Government retaxes the people to make them pay to the banks what they have provided themselves to the Government, it is sheer robbery and a form of slavery.

Whenever someone creates money for his own use, he is a counterfeiter, and the money so created is counterfeit. That's what the chartered banks are doing, and more than ninety-five percent of the money in this country is counterfeit. The fact that the Government is an accomplice to the counterfeiter changes nothing to this. The national debt is a false debt, since it was made by borrowing counterfeit money. The Government must erase it, annul it, make it disappear.

Violence is always wrong, and this is one more reason why the Government must resolve the debt-and-money question without delay. Otherwise, the people could revolt and do harm, not only to the swindling bankers and their accomplices, but to many innocent people, as it always happens in revolutions. This is what we must prevent at all costs.

Once again, thank you for having presented this important petition to the House of Commons. And I hope you will get a competent translator whose translations will reflect the original texts. Sincerely,

Leopold Soucy St. Leonard, N.B.

 

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