Beware of Harry Potter!

Written by Melvin Sickler on Tuesday, 01 January 2002. Posted in Witchcraft

A sneaky way to promote the occult

Who is Harry Potter?

Despite all the publicity he got, perhaps there are some of our readers who do not know who Harry Potter is. He is the hero of a series of books, written by British author J.K. Rowling, for children. In fact, it is the all-time best-seller book for children — 100 million copies have been sold worldwide, which have been translated into 40 different languages. Moreover, a movie was made a few months ago about the first book of the series, and it made the top of the list at the box offices.

In volume one, entitled Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Philosopher's Stone, we are introduced to the world of sorcery and to the boy who plays the pivotal role in the struggle between good and evil, as it is defined in the series. The story begins with the murder of Harry's parents, a witch and wizard, who are destroyed by another wizard named Voldemort, the chief of all the wizards who have gone too far into the practice of the “Dark Arts — the evil side of sorcery”. Harry is rescued by witches and wizards who take him to a suburb of London to be raised by his aunt and uncle, Mr. and Mrs. Dursley. Harry knows nothing about his background.

On his eleventh birthday, he begins to discover that he has some mysterious powers. He soon meets witches and wizards who harass the Dursleys with magic in order to obtain their permission for Harry to attend Hogwarts, a school of witchcraft and wizardry.

At Hogwarts castle, Harry meets the headmaster, Professor Dumbledore, who is also the unofficial chief of the “good wizards” in the world. The wizard world coexists with the world of the Muggles (the ordinary people who are not wizards), but it is so enchanted that ordinary humans are blinded to its existence.

Truly satanic!

The only teaching Harry gets at school is making magic potions, tricks of magic. They say good magic can be used for good, even though supernatural powers belong only to God.

In the book, Harry never prays. The only religious character is a fat little monk. He is one of the phantoms at the college in the story. The only time they mention a church is in the 4th volume in the scene of satanic sacrifice. Book after book becomes more and more immoral. From volume to volume, the adventurers of Potter become more and more terrifying and bloody.

Chapter 32 of the 4th volume is the most terrible of all. In that chapter, there is a black wizard who kills a schoolmate of Harry Potter under his own eyes in the cemetery. Then during a satanic ritual, he raises from the dead Lord Voldemort, the one who killed the parents of Harry.

To do so, he throws into a big container of boiling water a kind of monstrous child, and they add the bones of dead corpuses taken from graves, with some of the blood of Harry Potter, all the while pronouncing formulas that recall in a blasphemous way the words of the Eucharistic consecration. It only makes one wonder what will come out in the next book!

Each book of this series corresponds to a school year in the life of Harry Potter. So far, four books have been written, and there are three more to go.

To keep children obsessed with Potter

Harry and the Goblet of FireThe first book of the series has approximately 300 pages, but the fourth book, Harry and the Goblet of Fire, has approximately 650 pages. It is impossible for a ten-year-old child to read it in a few weeks or even in a few months; it could take the whole year. But this is done on purpose to keep the minds of the children obsessed with Potter so they will think about him continuously.

Some will say that the Harry Potter is only a story, a fairly tale, and that it is harmless for children to read it. But if you study it deeper, you will see that it makes the occult look trivial, and that it is a sneaky way of promoting the occult among children. Children know full well that the story is make-believe. But on the subconscious level, they have absorbed it as experience, and this experience tells them that the mysterious forbidden is highly rewarding.

Contrary to the Bible and the Church

Harry learns how to throw magic spells. According to the book, there is no difference between black and white magic; all magic is good as long as you do it for good things. But the Bible and the Church do not agree.

In the Catechism of the Catholic Church, sections 2116-2117, it states the following: “All forms of divination are to be rejected: recourse to Satan or demons... Consulting horoscopes, astrology, palm reading, interpretation of omens and lots, the phenomena of clairvoyance, and recourse to mediums contradict the honor, respect, and loving fear that we owe to God alone.

“All practices of magic or sorcery, by which one attempts to fame occult powers, so as to place them at one's service and have a supernatural power over others, are gravely contrary to the virtue of religion. These practices are even more to be condemned when accompanied by the intention of harming someone, or when they have recourse to the intervention of demons. Wearing charms is also reprehensible. Spiritism often implies divination or magical practices; the Church for her part warns the faithful against it.”

The Potter series repeatedly portray in a positive light the very activities that are condemned in both the Old and New Testaments in the strongest possible terms. In Deuteronomy 18:9-12 is a passage in which enchanting divination, charms, consulting with familiar spirits, or a wizard or a necromancer, are described as an “abomination” in the eyes of God, and must be driven out. Numerous other passages forbidding the practice of witchcraft and wizardry, or consultation with mediums or diviners, can be found in Leviticus 19:31, 20:6, 27; Isaiah 8:19,  19:3; Galatians 5:19-21; and in Revelation 21:8, just to mention a few.

Plainly diabolical!

Rome has even spoken out against the Potter books. In early December of 2001, the Diocese of Rome's official exorcist, Father Gabriele Amorth, warned parents against the Harry Potter book series. The priest, who is also the president of the International Association of Exorcists, said Satan is behind the works.

In an interview with the Italian INSA news agency, Father Amorth said, “Behind Harry Potter hides the signature of the king of darkness, the devil.” The exorcist, with his decades of experience in directly combating evil, explained that J.K. Rowling's books contain innumerable positive references to magic, “the satanic art”. He noted that the books attempt to make a false distinction between black and white magic, when in fact, the distinction “does not exist, because magic is always a turn to the devil.”

In another interview, which was published in papers across Europe, Father Amorth denounced the disordered morality presented in Rowling's works, noting that they suggest that rules can be contravened, and that lying is justified when they work to one's benefit.

The Potter series might look innocent enoug! And yet, never has the occult come in such a desirable form, and never has it come in such a massive fashion. It does not take an expert to see that Potter casts spells, that he employs witchcraft, and that the books about him contain the names of actual demons. Witchcraft is presented as being exciting and powerful. Witches are portrayed as friendly, positive, supportive, and good. One former witch — now a pastor — described the Potter series as “witchcraft manuals” written at a surprising level of sophistication.

To orient our youth in the direction of the occult, and to expose them to such forces in the name of fun, is very dangerous. Already, the Pagan Federation in England receives an average of 100 inquiries a month from young people who want to become witches — an unprecedented phenomenon which is attributed in part to the Potter books.

Parents: Wake up!

Rowlings' stories create the impression that some of us could learn to handle occult powers and wield them for good. This is a grave error, for our intentions, however noble, cannot transform an objective evil into a good.

No Christian family should allow their children to read the Potter books. Parents must be warned that exposing their children to the enchanting world of Harry Potter is playing with a fire from hell. A set of books which glamorizes and normalizes occult activity is as deadly to the soul as sexual sin, if not more so! Children must be taught that the practice of magic is a major offense against God, something that is very serious in nature.

Parents need to pray daily for the spiritual protection of their families. They need to ask God for the extraordinary gifts of wisdom and discernment. They must know what their children are reading, and they should encourage their children to model after the saints whom we know are now in Heaven. For what is our life on earth all about but to work our way to the Kingdom of Heaven. Meditating on witchcraft and the occult will just not bring one on the right road!

Parents, take on your responsibilities of protecting the souls of your children, and make known to those around you the evils presented in the Potter series. Remember: All that is needed for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing!

About the Author

Melvin Sickler

Melvin Sickler

Melvin Sickler is a remarkable apostle. He does the door-to-door Rosary Crusade all over Canada and the United States to solicit subscriptions to Michael, and hold meetings.